As Liverpool owes its existence to shipping, transportation has always been of great importance and the city has witnessed some iconic transport development in its history:

The Port of Liverpool

The first enclosed docks were developed in Liverpool and the port in its heyday was one of the most important in the world with nine miles of docks stretching from Herculaneum in the South to Seaforth in the north.

The Mersey Ferry

One of the most famous ferries in the world, services were first started by the monks of Birkenhead Priory in the 13th century. The ferry still maintains an important commuter function but is now mainly targetted at the tourist market.

The Merseyrail Network

One of only three underground systems outside of London, Merseyrail is centred around the Mersey Railway which was the first underground system in the world with lift access to its stations.

The Mersey Tunnel

The Queensway (Liverpool to Birkenhead) tunnel, was the longest road tunnel in the world when opened in 1934. It has four traffic lanes and was also the largest sub-aqueous tunnel in the world. It has since been joined by the Kingsway (Liverpool to Wallasey) tunnel.

The Liverpool Overhead Railway

Now sadly, just a memory, the Docker's Umbrella stretched from Dingle in the South to Seaforth Sands in the north and was the only example of an 'el' this side of the Atlantic.

Liverpool John Lennon Airport

Liverpool Airport opened in 1933 and swiftly grew to become second only to London (Croydon) in terms of pre-war passenger numbers. Post war it became increasingly dominated by rival Manchester but major expansion in the last fifteen years has moved it into the top ten of British airports. The pre-war passenger terminal and hangars, now converted to other uses, are amongst the most important survivals from that period in the whole of Europe.