Butterflies and moths are insects in the order Lepidoptera. Virtually all butterfly and moth species—including all the ones in the Yuba-Sutter area—eat plants exclusively. More than half of all herbivorous insect species in the United States are butterflies and moths, and the caterpillars of these various species are consequently a primary food source for most bird species in the United States.1

All butterflies in the gossamer-wing family are all rather small, while those in the swallowtail family are large and have a tail-like extension on each hindwing. Butterflies in the brushfoot family are generally of intermediate size. Butterflies in the skipper family are small and spread their hindwings when they land, while keeping their forewings relatively vertical.

As entomologist Douglas W. Tallamy explains in his book Bringing Nature Home: How You Can Sustain Wildlife with Native Plants:

People often ask what differentiates moths from butterflies. Several generalities can be made, but most are fraught with exceptions. Most moths are nocturnal, while all butterflies are diurnal (active by day). Moths are typically fatter and the scales on their wings rub off on your fingers quite easily. Butterflies, in contrast, are more streamlined in body and their wing scales are affixed more securely. Moth antennae are feathery (pectinate) or are narrow filaments without a terminal knob. Butterfly antenna always have a knob at the end that is recurved back like a small hook. Finally, moths usually hold their wings flat over their abdomen[s] when resting, while butterflies hold the wings upright and pressed tightly together. Skippers seem to be a compromise between moths and butterflies. Their most distinguishing trait is that they hold their two wings at different angles when at rest; the hind wing is spread wider than the forewing.

In the same book, Tallamy also explains that most insect species, including butterflies and moths, are only able to eat one or two plant species during their larval stage—native plant species that the insects have evolved alongside for milennia—and that these native plant species are increasingly endangered as areas of former wilderness are increasingly converted to suburbs or overrun by invasive weeds. As the native plant species become endangered, the butterflies that eat them also become endangered, and so do the birds that eat the butterflies. Unfortunately, many people who want to attract butterflies to their yard plant only non-native species such as "butterfly bush" that adult butterflies collect pollen from, but that caterpillars cannot eat. This does nothing to stop the eventual extinction of the butterflies. Tallamy explains what you can do to make a real difference:

Let's use the monarch butterfly as an example. Monarchs are in trouble for many reasons. For one thing, millions are hit by cars while en route to their Mexican wintering sites each fall. The most serious threat, though, is that the forests in which they spend the winter in the mountains of Mexico are being illegally logged. Thinning the forest buffer increases weather-related mortality in wintering monarch populations each year. Until the political will to protect the monarch's forests materializes, the only hope for this species is to make sure that those butterflies that do survive the winter reproduce successfully—and hugely—when they return to your backyards each summer.
A civic association could help local monarchs in several ways. First, members of the association could be encouraged to include milkweeds in private landscapes and public spaces alike. Monarchs, like most herbivores, are limited in their ability to make more monarchs primarily by food availability. The more food provided in the form of milkweed plants, the greater the number of monarchs produced. Next, the association could coordinate the sequential cutting of some milkweed patches in June, and again in July, so that monarch larvae will have tender, young milkweed leaves to eat not only in the early weeks of summer, but in August and early September as well. The civic association might also attempt to convince the township to stop mowing roadsides that support milkweed populations during the summer. A single cutting in mid-October is enough to maintain good road visibility and will avoid the needless destruction of roadside habitat. Restraint in mowing would also save the township money, as well as reduce the production of noise, carcinogens, and climate-changing gases [from lawnmowers].
Neighborhood children could be mobilized to keep records of monarch popukations over the years. What day does the first monarch return to your neighborhood each year? Whose milkweed garden is producing the most monarch larvae? How many monarchs pass through specified checkpoints in the neighborhood during the fall migration south? The degree to which your neighbrhood interacts with the monarch butterfly is limited only by your imagination. I can think of no better way to reconnect with nature than to adopt a species such as the monarch, or any number of plant and bird species with declining populations. Being part of a group that successfully restores the local population of a species in trouble will not only build camaraderie with your neighbors, but may be one of the most rewarding and fulfilling things you ever do.

Even if starting a neighborhood association sounds too difficult, you can do most of these same things to help save monarchs from extinction all by yourself. Just plant some milkweed! Or pick any other species of butterflies and moths listed in the charts below, all of which are native to the Yuba-Sutter area,2 and plant the species that their larvae depend on for food.

There is one butterfly species in the Yuba-Sutter area that is not native: the cabbage white butterfly, which is native to Europe but was accidentally imported to California a little over a century ago and has naturalized in both Yuba and Sutter Counties. Because it is a native to Europe, its caterpillars eat primarily the leaves of plants that are native to Europe—including many of our most invasive weeds: mustards, radishes, horseradish, Mediterranean hoary mustard, broadleaf pepperweeds, and garden nasturtium.

There are several moth species in the Yuba-Sutter area that are not native, including the common clothes moth.

Butterflies

Brushfoot Family

Species Found in Caterpillars Eat Leaves of Adults Drink Nectar of More Info at
Milkweed Butterflies: The monarch (Danaus plexippus) is an example of a milkweed butterfly. Photo by queerbychoice.
monarch Yuba and Sutter Counties native milkweeds (non-native milkweeds can be bad for them!) milkweeds, wild hyacinths, coyote mints, barberries, urticifolia California licorice mints, desert willows, Venus thistles, coast sunflowers, serpentine sunflowers, bladderpods, blue lobelias, golden currants, black sage, and woolly blue curls Art Shapiro's Butterfly Site and Las Pilitas Nursery
Longwings:
Callippe fritillary Yuba County California golden violet exclusively coyote mints, milkweeds, sages,Indianhemp dogbane, and yerba santa Art Shapiro's Butterfly site and Las Pilitas Nursery
Coronis fritillary Yuba County violets California buckeyes, Venus thistles,rabbitbrush, goldenrods, and California asters Art Shapiro's Butterfly site
Hydaspe fritillary Yuba County violets milkweeds, giant hyssops,Indianhemp dogbane, and yerba santa Art Shapiro's Butterfly site
Zerene fritillary Yuba County violets milkweeds, giant hyssops,Venus thistles, rabbitbrush, and alfalfa Art Shapiro's Butterfly site
True Brushfoots: California tortoiseshell (Nymphalis californica), shown near Strawberry Valley, is an example of a true brushfoot. Photo by queerbychoice. Mylitta crescent (Phyciodes mylitta), shown on turkey-tangle fogfruit in Marysville, is an example of a true brushfoot. Photo by queerbychoice. West Coast lady (Vanessa annabella), shown on turkey-tangle fogfruit in Marysville, is an example of a true brushfoot. Photo by queerbychoice.
Milbert's tortoiseshell Yuba and Sutter Counties      
Leanira checkerspot Yuba and Sutter Counties paintbrushes naked buckwheat, coyote mints, yerba santa, and woolly sunflowers Art Shapiro's Butterfly Site
Northern checkerspot Yuba and Sutter Counties roughleaf asters, rabbitbrush, and goldenrods milkweeds, California buckeyes, Indianhemp dogbane, Venus thistles, yerba santa, and woolly sunflowers Art Shapiro's Butterfly Site
Chalcedon checkerspot Yuba and Sutter Counties beardtongues, monkeyflowers, snowberries, rabbitbrush, Venus thistles, Chinese houses, chuparosa, sand asters, turkey-tangle fogfruit, desert asters, California figwort, and desert sunflowers coyote mints, daisies, pincushion flowers,California buckeyes, yerba santa, globe gilyflower, California yerba santa, serpentine sunflowers, phacelias, fragrant sumac, and black sage Art Shapiro's Butterfly Site and Las Pilitas Nursery
common buckeye Yuba and Sutter Counties monkeyflowers, snapdragons, turkey-tangle fogfruit, and plantains coyote brushes, rabbitbrush, and sages Art Shapiro's Butterfly Site and Las Pilitas Nursery
mourning cloak Yuba and Sutter Counties willows, common hackberries, and elms willows and rabbitbrush Art Shapiro's Butterfly Site
California tortoiseshell Yuba and Sutter Counties California lilacs manzanitas Art Shapiro's Butterfly Site and Las Pilitas Nursery
Mylitta crescent Yuba and Sutter Counties Venus thistles and non-native plumeless thistles and milk thistles thistles, rabbitbrush, yerba santa, and wild heliotrope Art Shapiro's Butterfly Site
field crescent Yuba and Sutter Counties      
green comma Yuba County willows and Western azalea members of the aster family Art Shapiro's Butterfly Site
hoary comma Yuba County currants   Las Pilitas Nursery
satyr comma Sutter County hoary nettle   Art Shapiro's Butterfly Site
West Coast lady Yuba and Sutter Counties bush mallows, checker mallows, globe mallows, and stinging nettles milkweeds, sages, and turkey-tangle fogfruit Art Shapiro's Butterfly Site and Las Pilitas Nursery
red admiral Yuba and Sutter Counties stinging nettles and other members of the nettle family   Art Shapiro's Butterfly Site and Las Pilitas Nursery
painted lady Yuba and Sutter Counties Venus thistles, fiddlenecks, cryptanths, cheeseweeds, stinging nettles, and other plants in the aster, borage, and mallow families blue lobelias, Caliornia asters, rabbitbrush, and sages Art Shapiro's Butterfly Site and Las Pilitas Nursery
American lady Yuba and Sutter Counties pearly everlastings buckwheats, coyote mints, milkweeds, Indianhemp dogbane, coyote brushes, rabbitbrush, sages, and goldenrods Art Shapiro's Butterfly Site and Las Pilitas Nursery
Admirals and Relatives:
California sister Yuba and Sutter Counties oaks, especially the evergreen ones native edible fruits, California buckeyes, giant hyssops, Indianhemp dogbane, coyote brushes, yerba santa, and goldenrods Art Shapiro's Butterfly Site and Las Pilitas Nursery
Lorquin's admiral Yuba and Sutter Counties willows, Western chokecherries, and Frémont's cottonwoods coyote mints, California buckeyes, buttonbushes, and California yerba santa Art Shapiro's Butterfly Site and Las Pilitas Nursery
Satyrs and Wood-Nymphs:
Great Basin wood nymph Yuba County buckwheats and members of the aster family   Art Shapiro's Butterfly Site
common ringlet Yuba and Sutter Counties perennial grasses   Art Shapiro's Butterfly Site

Gossamer-Wing Family

Species Found in Caterpillars Eat Leaves of Adults Drink Nectar of More Info at
Coppers:
lustrous copper Yuba County sheep sorrel and alpine sorrel clovers, pussypaws, pepperweeds, and members of the aster family Art Shapiro's Butterfly Site
gorgon copper Yuba County naked buckwheats naked buckwheats, milkweeds, Indianhemp dogbane, and woolly sunflowers Art Shapiro's Butterfly Site
purplish copper Yuba and Sutter Counties knotweeds, cinquefoils, and docks coyote brushes, wild heliotrope, alfalfa, turkey-tangle fogfruit, and California asters Art Shapiro's Butterfly Site
blue copper Yuba County buckwheats   Art Shapiro's Butterfly Site
great copper Sutter County curly dock Indianhemp dogbane, gum plants, wild heliotrope, pepperweeds, common horehound, and members of the carrot family Art Shapiro's Butterfly Site
Hairstreaks: Gray hairstreak (Strymon melinus), shown on a California aster in a Marysville garden, is an example of a hairstreak. Photo by queerbychoice.
great purple hairstreak Yuba and Sutter Counties bigleaf mistletoe, Eastern mistletoe, and Pacific mistletoe milkweeds, California buckeyes, Indianhemp dogbane, lantanas, pepperweeds, goldenrods, zinnias, and members of the carrot family Art Shapiro's Butterfly Site and Las Pilitas Nursery
Western green hairstreak Yuba and Sutter Counties      
brown elfin Yuba and Sutter Counties California lilacs, soap lilies, dodder, and madrone   Las Pilitas Nursery
bramble green hairstreak Yuba County buckwheats, California lilacs, and California broom buckwheats, California buckeyes, Indianhemp dogbane, Red Valerian, yerba santa, and woolly sunflowers Art Shapiro's Butterfly Site and Las Pilitas Nursery
Western pine elfin Yuba County      
Muir's hairstreak Yuba County      
Nelson's hairstreak Yuba County      
thicket hairstreak Yuba County      
golden hairstreak Yuba County canyon live oak and tanbark oak   Art Shapiro's Butterfly Site
gold-hunter's hairstreak Yuba and Sutter Counties oaks naked buckwheat, California buckeyes, Indianhemp dogbane, and yerba santa Art Shapiro's Butterfly Site
California hairstreak Yuba and Sutter Counties California lilacs, oaks, willows, Western chokecherries, Saskatoon serviceberries, tobacco brush, and mountain mahogany buckwheats, milkweeds, oaks, California buckeyes, Indianhemp dogbane, common horehound, alfalfa, and sweetclovers Art Shapiro's Butterfly Site and Las Pilitas Nursery
hedgerow hairstreak Yuba County California lilacs buckwheats and rabbitbrush Art Shapiro's Butterfly Site
Sylvan hairstreak Yuba and Sutter Counties willows milkweeds, naked buckwheat, yarrow, Indianhemp dogbane, and members of the carrot family Art Shapiro's Butterfly Site
mountain mahogany hairstreak Yuba County mountain mahogany buckwheats, milkweeds, California buckeyes, yerba santa, alfalfa], yellow Ivesia, alfalfa, white sweetclover Art Shapiro's Butterfly Site
gray hairstreak Yuba and Sutter Counties buckwheats, clovers, deervetches, oaks, pines, coffeeberries, doveweeds, cheeseweeds, alfalfa, and members of the pea and mallow families daisies, wild heliotrope and white-flowered members of the carrot family Art Shapiro's Butterfly Site and Las Pilitas Nursery
Blues: This female Acmon blue (Plebejus acmon), shown on a California aster in a Marysville garden, is an example of a blue. The top side of a male's wings are blue. Photo by queerbychoice.
Western pygmy-blue Yuba and Sutter Counties spear orache, Australian saltbush, pickleweeds, Russian thistles, Western sea purslane, seablites native daisies, coyote brushes, and goldenrods Art Shapiro's Butterfly Site
Western tailed-blue Yuba County      
Eastern tailed-blue Yuba and Sutter Counties      
Pacific dotted-blue Yuba County naked buckwheat   Art Shapiro's Butterfly Site
silvery blue Yuba and Sutter Counties perennial lupines, Lathyrus jepsonii, and vetches fiddlenecks Art Shapiro's Butterfly Site
arrowhead blue Yuba County perennial lupines buckwheats, Indianhemp dogbane, yerba santa, vetches, and members of the mint family Art Shapiro's Butterfly Site
Acmon blue Yuba and Sutter Counties buckwheats, deervetches, lupines, saltbushes, canyon liveforevers, and knotweeds buckwheats, milkweeds, coyote brushes, rabbitbrush, and wild heliotrope Art Shapiro's Butterfly Site and Las Pilitas Nursery
Boisduval's blue Yuba County perennial lupines buckwheats, pussypaws, and members of the aster family Art Shapiro's Butterfly Site
lupine blue Yuba County buckwheats pussypaws Art Shapiro's Butterfly Site
greenish blue Yuba County native clovers clovers Art Shapiro's Butterfly Site

Metalmark Family

Species Found in Caterpillars Eat Leaves of Adults Drink Nectar of More Info at
Mormon metalmark Yuba County buckwheats buckwheats, nodding beggarticks, rabbitbrush, butterweeds, California asters, and other plants in the aster family Art Shapiro's Butterfly Site and Las Pilitas Nursery

Parnassian and Swallowtail Family

Species Found in Caterpillars Eat Leaves of Adults Drink Nectar of More Info at
Parnassians:
Clodius parnassian Yuba County Pacific bleeding heart coyote mints and yerba santa Art Shapiro's Butterfly Site
Swallowtails:
pipevine swallowtail Yuba and Sutter Counties California pipevine blue dicks, Ithuriel's spears, California buckeyesyerba santa, and radishes Art Shapiro's Butterfly Site
pale swallowtail Yuba and Sutter Counties buckthorns and California lilacs coyote mints, blue dicks, Ithuriel's spears, California buckeyes, columbines, yerba santa, Western wallflower, Washington lily, and American vetch Art Shapiro's Butterfly Site and Las Pilitas Nursery
Indra swallowtail Yuba County springparsleys and desertparsleys   Art Shapiro's Butterfly Site
two-tailed swallowtail Yuba and Sutter Counties Western chokecherries, ashes, Western sycamores, and Western hop trees milkweeds, California buckeyes, giant hyssops, yerba santa, and Humboldt's lilies Art Shapiro's Butterfly Site
Western tiger swallowtail Yuba and Sutter Counties willows, Western chokecherries, alders, birches, ashes, privets, sweet gums, Western sycamores, Frémont's cottonwoods, and lilacs coyote mints, milkweeds, California buckeyes, Indianhemp dogbaneyerba santa, Humboldt's lilies, blue lobelia, sages, lilacs, and woolly blue curls Art Shapiro's Butterfly Site and Las Pilitas Nursery
anise swallowtail Yuba and Sutter Counties Brewer's angelica, poison hemlock, water hemlock, wild carrots, fennels, desertparsleys, water parsleys, yampahs, and umbrellaworts beardtongues, coyote mints, blue dicks, Ithuriel's spears, Western chokecherries, California buckeyes, buttonbushes, Venus thistles, yerba santa, and Western hop trees Art Shapiro's Butterfly Site and Las Pilitas Nursery

Skipper Family

Species Found in Caterpillars Eat Leaves of Adults Drink Nectar of More Info at
Spread-Wing Skippers: Common checkered-skipper (Pyrgus communis), shown on a rosilla in a Marysville garden, is an example of a spreadwing skipper. Photo by queerbychoice.
Persius duskywing Yuba and Sutter Counties deervetches   Art Shapiro's Butterfly Site
Propertius duskywing Yuba and Sutter Counties oaks milkweeds, blue dicks, California buckeyes, fiddlenecks, Indianhemp dogbane, pussypaws, yerba santa, phacelias, and American vetch Art Shapiro's Butterfly Site
mournful duskywing Yuba and Sutter Counties valley oaks California buckeyes, yerba santa, and Western vervain Art Shapiro's Butterfly Site
Northern white-skipper Yuba and Sutter Counties bush mallows and globe mallows rabbitbrush, yerba santa, blue lobelias, and butterweeds Art Shapiro's Butterfly Site and Las Pilitas Nursery
common sootywing Yuba and Sutter Counties pigweeds clovers and turkey-tangle fogfruit Art Shapiro's Butterfly Site
common checkered-skipper Yuba and Sutter Counties Frémont's bush mallow, alkali mallow, checker mallows, globe mallows, and cheeseweeds daisies and rosillas Art Shapiro's Butterfly Site
small checkered-skipper Yuba and Sutter Counties alkali mallow   Art Shapiro's Butterfly Site
Northern cloudywing Yuba County deervetches, leather roots, and peas cluster-lilies, California buckeyes, Indianhemp dogbane, yerba santa, and American vetch Art Shapiro's Butterfly Site
Grass Skippers: Fiery skipper (Hylephila phyleus), shown on a California aster in a Marysville garden, is an example of a grass skipper. Photo by queerbychoice.
common roadside-skipper Yuba County perennial grasses Indianhemp dogbane, American vetch, and members of the mint family Art Shapiro's Butterfly Site
sachem Yuba and Sutter Counties perennial grasses, especially bermuda grass and dallis grasses Indianhemp dogbane, coyote brushes, Venus thistles, rabbitbrush, alfalfa, goldenrods, and common verbena Art Shapiro's Butterfly Site
Western branded skipper Yuba County sweet vernal grass coyote mints, naked buckwheat, and Indianhemp dogbane Art Shapiro's Butterfly Site
Juba skipper Yuba County perennial grasses dandelions, pussypaws, rabbitbrush, and California aster Art Shapiro's Butterfly Site
Lindsey's skipper Yuba County perennial grasses clarkias, big scale balsam root and mule ears Art Shapiro's Butterfly Site
fiery skipper Yuba and Sutter Counties perennial grasses, especially bermuda grass and alkali grass California asterlantanas, marigolds, common verbena, and zinnias Art Shapiro's Butterfly Site
Eufala skipper Yuba and Sutter Counties perennial or summer-annual grasses, especially bermuda grass, barnyard grasses, dallis grasses, sorghum, and rice wild heliotrope, turkey-tangle fogfruit, and American vetch Art Shapiro's Butterfly Site
rural skipper Yuba and Sutter Counties perennial grasses coyote mints, California buckeyes, and yerba santa Art Shapiro's Butterfly Site
woodland skipper Yuba and Sutter Counties perennial grasses Indianhemp dogbane, coyote brushes, rabbitbrush, goldenrods, and California aster Art Shapiro's Butterfly Site
umber skipper Yuba County perennial grasses milkweeds, California buckeyes, Indianhemp dogbane, coyote brushes, Venus thistles, yerba santa Art Shapiro's Butterfly Site
sandhill skipper Yuba and Sutter Counties alkali grass and occasionally bermuda grass rabbitbrush, wild heliotrope, turkey-tangle fogfruit, and California aster Art Shapiro's Butterfly Site
Sonora skipper Yuba County perennial grasses pussypaws, goldenrods, and California aster Art Shapiro's Butterfly Site

White and Sulfur Family

Species Found in Caterpillars Eat Leaves of Adults Drink Nectar of More Info at
Whites:
Pacific orangetip Yuba and Sutter Counties California toothworts, rock toothworts, wintercresses; mustards, radishes, hedgemustards blue dicks, fiddlenecks, California buckeyes, yerba santa, and members of the mustard family Art Shapiro's Butterfly Site
large marble Yuba and Sutter Counties mustards, radishes, flixweeds, California mustards, and hedgemustards   Art Shapiro's Butterfly Site
California marble Yuba County rockcresses and jewelflowers blue dicks, fiddlenecks, phacelias, jewelflowers, Indianhemp dogbane, yerba santa, and members of the aster and mustard families Art Shapiro's Butterfly Site
pine white Yuba County yellow pines and gray pines daisies, thistles, goldenrods, and rabbitbrush Art Shapiro's Butterfly Site
margined white Yuba County      
checkered white Yuba and Sutter Counties mustards, hedgemustards, pepperweeds, Mediterranean hoary mustard, tall tumblemustard, and other usually small, unsucculent members of the mustard family daisies, rabbitbrush, alfalfa, and other plants in the aster, mustard, and pea families Art Shapiro's Butterfly Site and Las Pilitas Nursery
spring white Yuba County rockcresses, jewelflowers, and flixweed   Art Shapiro's Butterfly Site
Sulfurs:
orange sulfur Yuba and Sutter Counties clovers, deervetches, lupines, milkvetches, alfalfa, vetch, and other plants in the pea family deervetches, milkweeds, and sand asters Art Shapiro's Butterfly Site and Las Pilitas Nursery
California dogface Yuba and Sutter Counties California false indigo exclusively coyote mints, thistles, sages, vervains, California buckeyes, California fuchsias, and woolly blue curls Art Shapiro's Butterfly Site and Las Pilitas Nursery

Moths

Wild Silk Moth Family

Species Found in Caterpillars Eat Leaves of Adults Drink Nectar of More Info at
Polyphemus moth Yuba County      
Ceanothus silkmoth Yuba County      

Sphinx Moth and Hawkmoth Family

Species Found in Caterpillars Eat Leaves of Adults Drink Nectar of More Info at
Sphinx Moths:
Carolina sphinx moth Sutter County      
big poplar sphinx moth Sutter County      
one-eyed sphinx moth Sutter County      
great ash sphinx moth Sutter County      
Hawkmoths:
bumblebee moth Yuba County snowberries and honeysuckles snowberries, coyote mints, milkweeds, honeysuckles, sages, and Venus thistles Las Pilitas Nursery

Prominent Family

Species Found in Caterpillars Eat Leaves of Adults Drink Nectar of More Info at
white-dotted prominent moth Yuba and Sutter Counties      

Tiger Moth and Lichen Moth Family

Species Found in Caterpillars Eat Leaves of Adults Drink Nectar of More Info at
Pericopine Moths:
Pericopine moth Sutter County      
Lichen Moths:
lichen moth Sutter County      
Tiger Moths: Salt marsh caterpillars (Estigmene acrea) are one of several species of tiger moth caterpillars that are sometimes referred to as "woolly bears" because of their fur, which darkens to black and brown as they age. This one is shown on a California aster in Marysville. Photo by queerbychoice.
salt marsh moth Sutter County      
California tiger moth Yuba County      
Mexican tiger moth Yuba and Sutter Counties      
Isabella tiger moth Yuba County      
wandering tiger moth Yuba County      
vestal tiger moth Yuba County      
Syntomine Moths:
yellow-collared scape moth Yuba and Sutter Counties      

Owlet Moths and Miller Moth Family

Species Found in Caterpillars Eat Leaves of Adults Drink Nectar of More Info at
flower moth Sutter County      

Oecophorid Moth Family

Species Found in Caterpillars Eat Leaves of Adults Drink Nectar of More Info at
Depressariine Moths: Sabulella depressariine moth (Agonopterix sabulella), shown on yarrow foliage in a Marysville garden. Photo by queerbychoice.
Barbarella depressariine moth Yuba County      
Sabulella depressariine moth Yuba County      
Oecophorine Moths:
Stonda oecophorine moth Yuba County      
Fernaldella oecophorine moth Yuba County      
Ethmiine Moths:
Discostrigella ethmiine moth Sutter County      
Plagiobothrae ethmiine moth Yuba County      

Links

Butterfly Moth Lepidoptera Butterflies and Moths Art Shapiro's Butterfly Site Las Pilitas Nursery: California Butterflies and California Native Plants

Footnotes

1. Bringing Nature Home: How You Can Sustain Wildlife with Native Plants by Douglas W. Tallamy. Portland: Timber Press, 2007
2. Butterflies and Moths